A Message From Peter Coyote

Peter Coyote is a proud advisory board member of Project Coyote. Discover why Project Coyote exists and what you can do to protect the environment.

EVENTS (See all events here)

A Message From Dan Flores

Dan Flores, Bestselling Author of “Coyote America“, discusses the story of “Coyote America” and why it is important to co-exist with coyotes.

Project Coyote
Project Coyote updated their profile picture.Sunday, February 18th, 2018 at 9:13am
Promoting coexistence between people and wildlife through science, education & advocacy. Join our pack! Check out our web page for coexisting news & tips. www.projectcoyote.org
Project Coyote
Project Coyote added 2 new photos.Saturday, February 17th, 2018 at 5:51pm
Having a blast at the Grass Valley Film Festival. Wish you were here.
🐺🐾🐺💙🐾🐺🐾🐺
Project Coyote
Project CoyoteSaturday, February 17th, 2018 at 11:21am
Kangaroo lands a punch.
Project Coyote
Project CoyoteSaturday, February 17th, 2018 at 10:41am
By Letters to the Editor

Pennsylvania will host many coyote-killing contests this winter. I hope that Keystone State citizens, along with those participating in, organizing, and benefitting financially from these contests will further evaluate their ethics and efficacy.

I was raised in a family of hunters and anglers, who taught me what constitutes true sportsmanship--which is part of the reason I take issue with coyote-killing contests. Many hunting advocates agree, such as Jim Posewitz, founder of Orion: The Hunter's Institute, who defines ethical hunting as "the fair chase pursuit of free-roaming wildlife in a noncompetitive situation." Coyote killing contests violate this commonly-accepted ethical code for hunters.

These contests are ineffective at reducing coyote populations. According to Iowa State University, when coyotes are heavily hunted, "the number of pups that survive to adulthood can significantly increase." And killing coyotes, even in large numbers, doesn't increase fawn survival rates. A 2016 Outdoor Life article reported that fawn survival, although initially improved after one year of coyote removal, decreased again the following year of coyote removal. Our own Pennsylvania Game Commission recently pointed out that "...predator control does not work," that predators don't compete with hunters for game, and that deer habitat restoration was far more important. And Duane Diefenbach of PSU's Department of Ecosystem Science and Management adds, "...available evidence indicates the simpler solution of reducing harvest of antlerless deer can compensate for increased coyote predation in most situations."

Unethical, unscientific, and ineffective coyote-killing contests do not reflect Pennsylvania's tradition of fair sportsmanship.

Katie Thorne, Pittsburgh
Project Coyote
Project Coyote shared Camilla Fox's post.Saturday, February 17th, 2018 at 9:09am
Camilla Fox, Jana Hofeditz & Fauna Tomlinson @ the Grass Valley Animal Film Festival. Our film Killing Games won 1st! Ending coyote killing contest. 🐺🏆🥇🐺

Saturday, February 17th, 2018 at 2:51pm
Having a blast at the Grass Valley Film Festival. Wish you were here.
🐺🐾🐺💙🐾🐺🐾🐺
Saturday, February 17th, 2018 at 7:41am
By Letters to the Editor

Pennsylvania will host many coyote-killing contests this winter. I hope that Keystone... https://t.co/tTtPeEN5ae
Saturday, February 17th, 2018 at 6:09am
Camilla Fox, Jana Hofeditz & Fauna Tomlinson @ the Grass Valley Animal Film Festival. Our film Killing Games won... https://t.co/WyDourQaPY

WHO WE ARE

Project Coyote, a national non-profit organization based in Northern California, is a North American coalition of scientists, educators, ranchers and citizen leaders promoting compassionate conservation and coexistence between people and wildlife through education, science and advocacy. We work to change laws and policies to protect native carnivores from abuse and mismanagement, advocating coexistence instead of killing.

WHAT WE DO

All of our work — through education, science, and advocacy — strives to create fundamental and systemic changes in the ways wild carnivores are viewed and treated in North America. Project Coyote seeks to stop the wanton and cruel killing of native carnivores, to reform predator management, to create successful models of coexistence, and to inspire the next generation to care for Wild Nature.

WHY CARNIVORES

Since European colonists stepped foot on the North American continent, native carnivores have been viewed as a threat to livestock and to species humans hunt for food. Like Native Americans, carnivores have been brutally killed and bountied in an effort to eradicate their populations. As the most persecuted and maligned native predator, the coyote represents all misunderstood and exploited predators.

TAKE ACTION!

Your voice matters. Learn more about our latest campaigns and what you can do to help.

PROMOTE COEXISTENCE

Learn more about how to peacefully coexist with predators in both urban and rural environments.

VOLUNTEER

Do you have skills and interest in helping Project Coyote achieve its mission? Join our dedicated team of volunteers who give their time and talents to making this a better world for wildlife.

COME TO AN EVENT

Project Coyote hosts a range of events across the nation. Check out the calendar to find an event near you.