Why are coyotes so polarizing?

Why are coyotes so polarizing?

First things first: Coyote. When you read the word, how many syllables do you hear? Your answer, according to Dan Flores, author of Coyote America, may be “immediately diagnostic of a whole range of belief systems and values.” The ki-YOH-tee versus ki-yote divide is one of the best indicators of a person’s coyote politics, a nearly hard-and-fast way that we subconsciously identify ourselves: as defenders of the species, in the case of the former, or as a manager, shooter and/or trapper, in the latter.

On the value of coyotes and other non-human life

On the value of coyotes and other non-human life

Over a chilly weekend earlier this year in Pennsylvania, thousands of shooters participated in the Mosquito Creek Coyote Hunt, a “killing contest.” Now in its 26th year, this year’s event offered $46,000 in prize money ($10 entry fee multiplied by 4,660 entrants) for the “right” to take a coyote life. This is one of more than 20 staged assaults against coyotes in Pennsylvania. Nationwide, there are many sponsored slaughters throughout the year that, without reason, wipe out wildlife.

These Wildlife Conservationists Haven’t Given Up Hope

These Wildlife Conservationists Haven’t Given Up Hope

Dave Parsons, 69, former Mexican Wolf recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service — Parsons oversaw the release of 11 Mexican wolves from three different packs into the wild of Arizona’s Apache Forest while working for the USFWS. “I’ve spent 17 years years since my retirement trying to protect the Mexican wolves’ right to exist,” he says. “There are many people who want it to go extinct, but I’m still devoting my life to it.”